Council Meeting

 Wednesday, 16 September 2020 at 6:30pm

 

Cumberland City Council Chambers

Merrylands Service Centre, 16 Memorial Avenue, Merrylands

 


 

Councillor Contact Details

 

 

Granville Ward

Clr Steve Christou

(Mayor)

0419 651 187

Steve.Christou@cumberland.nsw.gov.au

Clr Joseph Rahme

0418 995 471

Joseph.Rahme@cumberland.nsw.gov.au

Clr Ola Hamed

0405 070 007

Ola.Hamed@cumberland.nsw.gov.au

Greystanes Ward

Clr Eddy Sarkis

(Deputy Mayor)

0418 306 918

Eddy.Sarkis@cumberland.nsw.gov.au

Clr Greg Cummings

0417 612 717

Greg.Cummings@cumberland.nsw.gov.au

Vacant

-

-

Regents Park Ward

Clr Ned Attie

0419 583 254

Ned.Attie@cumberland.nsw.gov.au

Clr George Campbell

0409 233 315

George.Campbell@cumberland.nsw.gov.au

Clr Kun Huang

0418 911 774

Kun.Huang@cumberland.nsw.gov.au

South Granville Ward

Clr Paul Garrard

0414 504 504

Paul.Garrard@cumberland.nsw.gov.au

Clr Tom Zreika

0400 805 303

Tom.Zreika@cumberland.nsw.gov.au

Clr Glenn Elmore

0418 459 527

Glenn.Elmore@cumberland.nsw.gov.au

Wentworthville Ward

Clr Michael Zaiter

0418 432 797

Michael.Zaiter@cumberland.nsw.gov.au

Clr Suman Saha

0419 546 950

Suman.Saha@cumberland.nsw.gov.au

Clr Lisa Lake

0418 669 681

Lisa.Lake@cumberland.nsw.gov.au

 

 

 

 

For  information  on  Council  services  and facilities  please  visit   www.cumberland.nsw.gov.au

 


Council Meeting

 16 September 2020

 ORDER OF BUSINESS

1    Opening Prayer / Acknowledgement of Country / National Anthem

2    Notice of Live Streaming of Council meeting

3    Apologies / Requests for Leave of Absence

4    Declarations of Pecuniary & Non Pecuniary Conflicts of Interest

5    Confirmation of Previous Minutes

C09/20-547    Minutes of the Ordinary Meeting of Council - 02 September 2020.......................................................................................... 5

6    Mayoral Minutes

Nil

7    Public Forum / Presentation of Petitions

8    Items Resolved by Exception

9    Reports to Council

      General Manager

C09/20-548    Legal Report................................................................... 21

      Director Community and Organisation Development

C09/20-549    Quarterly Update on Community Safety & Crime Prevention Plan........................................................................................... 23

C09/20-550    Response to Notice of Motion - Community Service Centre 29

C09/20-551    Cumberland City Council Community Grants Program....... 47

      Director Finance & Governance

C09/20-552    IPART Domestic Waste Management Charges Submission 97

C09/20-553    Investment Report - August 2020................................... 109

C09/20-554    Monthly Management Accounts July 2020...................... 133

      Director Environment & Planning

C09/20-555    Planning Proposal - Fresh Hope Site, Dunmore Street, Pendle Hill............................................................................................. 141

C09/20-556    Road Naming Proposal – Margaret Street, Merrylands.... 929

C09/20-557    Council Submission on Planning Proposal for 1 Crescent Street, Holroyd.............................................................. 937

      Director Works & Infrastructure

C09/20-558    Response to Notice of Motion - Food Delivery Services in the Cumberland LGA........................................................... 953

 

10  Reports of Council Committees

C09/20-559    Cumberland Traffic Committee - Minutes of the Electronic Meeting held on 5 August 2020...................................... 975

11  Motions Pursuant to Notice

C09/20-560    Notice of Motion - Cumberland Local Environmental Plan............................................................................ 1327

12  Notices of Rescission

Nil

13  Questions on Notice

Nil

14  Closed Session Reports

Nil

15  Other / General Matters

16  Close

 

 


Council Meeting

 16 September 2020

 

Item No: C09/20-547

Minutes of the Ordinary Meeting of Council - 02 September 2020

Responsible Division:                  Finance & Governance

Officer:                                      Director Finance & Governance

  

 

 

Recommendation

 

That Council confirm the minutes of the Ordinary Meeting of Council held on 02 September 2020.

 

Attachments

1.     Draft Minutes - 2 September 2020   

 


DOCUMENTS
ASSOCIATED WITH
REPORT C09/20-547

Attachment 1

Draft Minutes - 2 September 2020


Council Meeting

 16 September 2020

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Council Meeting

 16 September 2020

 

 

Item No: C09/20-548

Legal Report

Responsible Division:                  General Manager

Officer:                                      General Counsel

File Number:                              2041456

Community Strategic Plan Goal:  Transparent and accountable leadership  

 

 

Summary

This report provides Council with a summary of legal proceedings in which Council is involved.

 

Recommendation

 

That the report be received.

 

Report

This report provides Council with a summary of legal proceedings in which Council is involved.

It does not include the following types of legal proceedings:

1.     Proceedings that are managed by Council’s insurers;

2.     Local Court Proceedings involving an appeal against a parking fine; and

3.     Proceedings for the recovery of debts where those proceedings are being run by Council’s external debt collection agency.

The report is current to 31 August 2020. It does not capture changes that have occurred between that date and the date the report is considered by Council.

Community Engagement

There are no consultation processes for Council associated with this report.

Policy Implications

There are no policy implications for Council associated with this report.

Risk Implications

There are no risk implications for Council associated with this report.

Financial Implications

There are no financial implications for Council associated with this report.

CONCLUSION

This is an information report with the Legal Register provided as a confidential attachment.

 

Attachments

1.     Legal Report (confidential)   

 


Council Meeting

 16 September 2020

 

 

Item No: C09/20-549

Quarterly Update on Community Safety & Crime Prevention Plan

Responsible Division:                  Community and Organisation Development

Officer:                                      Director Community and Organisation Development

File Number:                              7860492

Community Strategic Plan Goal:  A safe accessible community  

 

 

Summary

This report provides an update on community safety and crime prevention initiatives undertaken by Council during the period May to August 2020.

 

Recommendation

That Council receive this report.

 

Report

Background

The Cumberland Community Safety and Crime Prevention Plan 2018 - 2022 was adopted in July 2018. The Plan identifies ten priority areas and 74 strategic actions to address priority crime-related issues and improve community safety in Cumberland. The Plan is a whole-of-Council document which is overseen by Council’s Crime Prevention Officer.

This report provides a summary of some of the key community safety and crime prevention initiatives undertaken during the period from May to August 2020.

 

Safety Site Assessments Undertaken

 

Six safety site assessments were undertaken by Council and Police in response to community or safety concerns. These assessments focus on Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design (CPTED) to identify opportunities that improve safety outcomes in an area. The following actions have been implemented or are recommended for improved infrastructure as a result of the assessments undertaken:

·   Civic Park, Pendle Hill - Installation of CCTV and upgrades to lighting were recommended due to increased complaints of antisocial behaviour occurring at the Park and these will be considered and incorporated into future park upgrades. The area is being monitored for any future issues. Pruning was recommended along the tennis court fence line, as the area is secluded and has minimal sightlines. The over-grown vegetation also impacted the lighting being emitted from the lights along the boundary. The smaller carpark adjacent to the tennis courts on Parkland Avenue had no source of lighting and it was recommended that an additional light be requested by the energy provider to illuminate the area. This has been completed.

·   Prospect Hill (Clunies Ross entrance), Pemulwuy - Due to increased vandalism and ongoing damage to the gate, it was recommended that bollards be installed to minimise ongoing damage and repair costs. Concrete blocks have been installed temporarily to minimise cars accessing the hill from this entrance and to minimise vandalism. The area is being monitored for any future issues.

·   Leeton Street, Merrylands - The site was assessed due to community concerns regarding anti-social behaviour occurring in the area however, upon inspection, no evidence was found and no recommended improvements required.

·   Churchill Street, Granville - The site was assessed due to concerns about the safety of the area. The area audited was not a Council asset however a request was placed with the property owner to address the identified safety concerns including lighting repairs and pruning of trees at the location. These items are being actioned by the property owner.

·   Monterey Street, Wentworthville - This site was re-assessed due to concerns raised by residents who reported cars accessing the grass area. This was reviewed and options for mitigating the issue are being explored including the installation of a low boundary fence. Lighting that was identified as non-operational was reported however there is a lack of lighting to the majority of this Park and additional lighting in the area is recommended. A request has been logged with the energy provider to review the current lighting and consider brighter lighting that will not impact any adjacent properties.

·   CV Kelly Park, Girraween - Due to concerns raised by residents regarding trail bikes accessing the area and causing damage, the site was assessed. A recommendation was made for Council to consider the rollout of cameras to be hardwired in open spaces that are heavily used to minimise damage occurring, reduce costs associated with repairs and minimise the impact the damage causes to park users and sports groups.

 

Lighting Audits

 

During the period, four lighting audits were conducted at:

 

·   Civic Park, Pendle Hill

·   Churchill Street, Granville

·   Monterey Street, Wentworthville

·   Union Road, Chester Hill

 

The audit of Civic Park, Pendle Hill identified several non-operational lights. These were the energy provider’s assets and have been reported for repair. An additional light was recommended and this work has been completed.

 

The other lighting audits identified all lighting to be operational, to standard, and not requiring further action.

 

 

 

CCTV in Public Places

 

·   CCTV camera relocations this quarter: 3

·   CCTV footage extraction requests: 21

 

A scheduled maintenance of all 36 relocatable cameras is currently being completed to improve the reliability of the cameras.

17 new fixed CCTV cameras have also been installed within the Merrylands CBD expanding Council’s CCTV in Public Spaces program. The new system allows direct access to CCTV footage by the Cumberland Police Area Command.

Road and Pedestrian Safety at Schools

 

Council rangers regularly patrol school areas across the Cumberland LGA to identify unsafe parking practices and offences. A total of 199 patrols across various schools were conducted over the period. The increase in the number of patrols was impacted by the COVID-19 restrictions at schools and issues arising due to the increase in traffic to many school zone areas.

 

A request has been made to the Highway Patrol to monitor areas where issues continue to persist.

 

Homelessness

 

Since the establishment of the grant-funded Homelessness Project Officer in December 2019, Council has completed a number of actions identified within the Cumberland Homelessness Action Plan. Between May and August, this has included the following:

 

·   Developing protocols and processes to support front-line staff in identifying and referring people at risk to homelessness outreach services.

·   Implementation of new internal protocols for Council staff to report people who are homeless or at-risk of homelessness.

·   Working closely with service providers to assist with the delivery of the Pilot Assertive Outreach Service in Cumberland. Since the commencement of the Pilot Program, approximately five rough sleepers have secured long term housing support and an additional six have been referred by Council Staff to Link2Home Service for Temporary Accommodation Assistance.

·   Development and delivery of Homelessness Awareness training programs to raise awareness amongst community leaders and community services in the Cumberland LGA.  A total of 27 participants were engaged in the training delivered in August.

·    Development and delivery of Homelessness Awareness training for Frontline Staff incorporating NSW Guidelines for working with Homeless people in public place. A total of 25 staff from across Council participated in the training delivered in August.

·   Online training was delivered to local real estate agents by Y Foundations aiming to raise awareness of the challenges for tenants in accessing secure housing and longer term accommodation options.

·   Delivery of a Homelessness Awareness Week media campaign to help drive attitudinal change and community education around ‘changing the narrative’.

 

The impact and challenges of COVID-19 have resulted in changes to the service landscape for direct service providers. The actions that remain in the Action Plan, rely heavily upon collaboration with Council’s network of services and sector specialists that have been required to direct their focus and energy to addressing the immediate needs of vulnerable people.

 

Council has continued to respond to ongoing issues of rough sleeping and health and safety issues across the LGA with a heightened focus given the current COVID-19 pandemic. Responses have involved engaging local services, Health and Police to support referrals related to addressing complex issues.

 

Council’s Place Liaison Team continue to provide ongoing support to front-line staff to identify and proactively respond to people at risk of homelessness, referring them to outreach services and providing advocacy and network support.

 

Council has regularly distributed information to vulnerable groups including health and homelessness service information which has delivered to homelessness and rough sleeper hotspots across Cumberland.

 

Personal Safety Community Education Program

 

Prior to COVID-19 restrictions, Council continued to deliver ‘Living Safely in Cumberland’ workshops across the LGA in partnership with Police from Cumberland and Auburn Police Area Commands. The workshops educate community members on how to avoid becoming victims of crime and encourage reporting to the Police.

 

Council’s social medial platforms are being utilised to continue promotion to the community of the key messages to minimise the risk of becoming victims of crime.

 

Cumberland Police Area Command’s Multicultural Liaison Officer is promoting the key messages in Arabic via Alive90.5FM (Cumberland Community Radio) and will deliver a variety of safety programs over a ten week period focusing on: reporting crime, scams, securing your home, securing your vehicle, safety whilst out and about, and domestic violence.

 

Domestic and Family Violence Prevention

 

Council has developed a series of five educational video resources on Domestic and Family Violence (DFV) that aim to increase community awareness and understanding of DFV, how to respond to DFV and how to best support someone who is experiencing violence.

 

The video resources will assist in providing accessible information to community groups and leaders across the Cumberland LGA, particularly those from non-English speaking backgrounds.  The videos were developed in consultation with leaders and groups from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds including six community organisations who work in the DFV sector. The videos are translated into five community languages using audio and text, (Arabic, Mandarin, Tamil, Korean and Dari) and are based on proficiency levels of English and representative groups within the Cumberland LGA.

 

The videos are currently available on Council’s website and have been shared with community networks. A social media campaign to promote their availability has also been undertaken.

 

Due to the impact of COVID-19, implementation of the Cumberland Domestic and Family Violence Sector Action Plan has been delayed. The sector-wide Plan aims to address domestic and family violence challenges in Cumberland and was developed together with 60 local services and government agencies. The Plan has a total of 12 actions that will be implemented collaboratively with 18 organisations, of which six are led by Council.  Partner organisations have reported an increased demand on their services as well as reduced capacity to meet the demand. 

 

Press for Help Alarms

Council has distributed 50 press-for-help mobile alarms to eligible seniors within the LGA who are socially isolated or at-risk to improve their safety, both at home and in the community.

 

Police Liaison and Responding to Community Safety Issues and Concerns

On average, Council’s Crime Prevention Officer responds to approximately ten community safety reports or concerns per week from residents. Over the period, a range of issues were raised including, anti-social behaviour, vandalism, graffiti, drug and alcohol issues, homelessness, illegal building works and illegal dumping. Many of these issues have been referred to the Police for joint action and to ensure a coordinated and appropriate level of response.

Council regularly liaises with both the Cumberland and Auburn Police Area Commands (PACs) in relation to a range of community, Police or Council identified crime prevention and safety issues. This includes facilitating site assessments, requesting high visibility Police patrols, investigating damage to Council property and other matters.

 

Policy Implications

Community safety is a key priority identified in the Community Strategic Plan, Goal 2: ‘A safe and accessible community’.

 

Council’s 2019 Community Satisfaction Survey identified community safety/crime prevention as a key priority area for Council.

 

The initiatives outlined in this report align with the priorities and actions identified in the Cumberland Community Safety and Crime Prevention Plan 2018 - 2022.

 

Risk Implications

The key risks associated with responding to community safety concerns and crime prevention initiatives include:

 

·   A limited capital budget available to immediately implement recommendations arising from Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design (CPTED) site assessments due to Council’s current financial challenges. Council continues to identify low cost solutions where possible and works together with the Police to monitor areas with ongoing safety concerns.

·   A limited supply of relocatable CCTV cameras to install in locations in response to emerging community priorities as well as Police identified hotspots. Many of these cameras are close to end of life and are in need of renewal or upgrade.

·   The time and resourcing involved in responding to individual community safety concerns impacts on the ability of Council to focus on other more strategic/LGA wide, evidence-based priorities.

 

Financial Implications

Council has received some grant funding to support the implementation of initiatives addressing domestic and family violence prevention, community safety education, crime prevention and homelessness.

 

There is limited capital funding available to address the ongoing and emerging lighting and CCTV infrastructure needs across Cumberland which are frequently identified.

 

Whilst Council pro-actively seeks funding to support the implementation of community safety initiatives such as the provision and expansion CCTV infrastructure, the ongoing costs associated with the maintenance and renewal of this infrastructure is not covered by these grants and becomes a recurrent expense to be borne by Council.

 

Council will continue to identify suitable funding opportunities to support the implementation of local safety initiatives. There are also ongoing opportunities for Council to advocate to the NSW and Federal Governments to support Council’s work in this area.

 

Attachments

Nil

 


Council Meeting

 16 September 2020

 

 

Item No: C09/20-550

Response to Notice of Motion - Community Service Centre

Responsible Division:                  Community and Organisation Development

Officer:                                      Director Community and Organisation Development

File Number:                              SC423

Community Strategic Plan Goal:  A great place to live  

 

 

Summary

This report provides a response to the Notice of Motion – Community Service Centre resolved at the Ordinary Meeting of Council on 1 July 2020 (Min.752).

 

Recommendation

That Council receive the report.

 

Report

At the Ordinary Meeting of Council held on 1 July 2020, Council considered a Notice of Motion – Community Service Centre and resolved (Min. 752):

“That Council be provided with a report regarding the feasibility of establishing a community service centre within an existing facility or otherwise, located in Wentworthville and any other local Centre that Council may deem appropriate.”

 

The report provides details of the suite of administrative customer service functions which would be available to the community at the proposed sites, and relevant costings and other considerations for the expansion of these services. This report also references content contained in the response to the Notice of Motion - Service Centres at Council Libraries and Community Centres resolved at the Ordinary Meeting of Council on 21 August 2019 as provided by the then Director Community Development.

 

Current Locations and Administrative Customer Service Functions Available

 

Cumberland City Council is one of the largest metropolitan Councils in Sydney covering 72km2, and being the fifth largest local government area by population in NSW. 

 

Access to our services can prove challenging for some members of our community due to the size and scale of our geographical area and also the diversity of our community.  Cumberland City Council is a leader in the provision of a vast array of contact channels including phone, in person, webchat, email and online services including social media. Irrespective of all the contact channels available, 14.7% of our population have poor English proficiency and prefer to contact Council in person, but the geographical distribution of our LGA and distance to our Customer Service Centres can pose a challenge.

 

Customer Service Centres

 

Council’s two Customer Service Centres, Auburn and Merrylands, provide a front counter service 5 days a week, which is staffed by dedicated Customer Service Officers who are trained in the full suite of customer service functions. These are complemented by Council’s Contact Centre located in Auburn which offers phone and webchat functions and the After-hours Contact Centre, which provides continued access to Council outside of our business hours. 

 

Administrative services provided from Customer Service Centres include:

·  General information and customer requests for:

Waste Enquiries (missed service, household clean-up bookings etc.)

Duty Planner Services

General Enquiries/Information provided

Finance & Rates Enquiries

Planning & Development

Parks & Recreation

Compliance & Environment

Property & Facilities

Road Maintenance

Community Development

Corporate Services

·  Complaints and Feedback

·  Payments (EFTPOS, cheque, cash, invoicing)

·  Application enquiries

·  Viewing of Council documents on public exhibition

·  Webchat services

 

Merrylands Community Service Centre

 

Council also operates the Merrylands Community Service Centre which currently provides the following services:

 

·  General information and customer requests for:

Waste Enquiries (missed service, household clean-up bookings etc.)

Duty Planner Services

General Enquiries/Information provided

Finance & Rates Enquiries

Planning & Development

Parks & Recreation

Compliance & Environment

Property & Facilities

Road Maintenance

Community Development

Corporate Services

Justice of the Peace services

 

Proposed Locations for New Community Service Centre

 

Several locations were identified as potential sites for a Community Service Centre including;

 

·    Allan G Ezzy Community Centre

·    Wentworthville Community Centre Hub

·    Berala Community Centre

Taking into consideration geographical location, proximity to public transport, accessibility and overall suitability, the Wentworthville Community Centre Hub and the Berala Community Centre have been identified and suitable options for a new proposed location.

Option 1: Wentworthville Community Centre Hub

2 Lane Street, Wentworthville

The Wentworthville Community Centre Hub is ideally positioned in the western part of our local government area in the Wentworthville Ward. Its proximity to Wentworthville train station, and major highways provides easy transport options. The site attracts at least 165 000 visitors per annum via visitations to the Wentworthville Library. The site also contains ample parking for staff and visitors. (See attachment 1)

Reception/Foyer Area Grevillia/Banksia Rooms

Estimated fitout cost: $77,628 (see attachment 2)

Floor space: 117 m2 approx.

The reception/foyer area is located in the building which hosts the Grevillia and Banksia rooms. The foyer/reception is a large area which has the capacity to cater for a higher volume of customers, has adequate space to display council information and easily accommodates a Development Enquiry Officer and/or other Council staff if required.

This option has amenities required such as toilets, kitchen, air-conditioning and is a suitable prospect for a long term presence.

The reception/foyer area is not a bookable or leased space and as such there would not be any impact on potential income for Council. This proposed space also does not impact the hiring of Banksia or Grevillia rooms and they can still be fully utilised in their current state. Furthermore Council technology such as the ticketing machine and display screen could be added in the future if required.

 

 

 

Option 2: Berala Community Centre

 98-104 Woodburn Rd, Berala

Estimated fitout cost: $0 (see attachment 2)

The Berala Community Centre is located in close proximity to Berala train station and bus stops. It is a modern community centre hub, with bookable spaces and a fully equipped office space for administrative work. The centre has accessible parking onsite with its own car park and attracts approx. 72,000 visitors per annum.  This option has amenities required such as toilets, kitchen, air-conditioning and requires no modifications to accommodate an increase in staffing numbers.  Furthermore the IT infrastructure is fully present and requires no upgrades or additions. 

 

Staff resourcing and capacity

Resourcing either option with existing Customer Service staff would require no training requirements as the staff are fully trained in all functions. Customer Service has transitioned a large part of its counter functions to a more online/electronic model meaning that that the traditional challenges of a paper based and cash service are largely non-existent. 

 

Additional staffing will be required to provide expanded or dedicated customer service functions at the new location.

 

Wentworthville Community Centre Hub staffing requirement:

2.4 FTE (Full Time Equivalents) comprising of:

·    2 FTE, in the form of 2 full time Customer Service Officers per site (minimum requirement for WHS).

·    0.4 FTE, in the form a Development Enquiry Officer 2 days per week is recommended at this stage.

 

Berala Community Centre staffing requirement:

1.4 FTE (Full Time Equivalents) comprising of:

·    1 FTE, in the form of 1 full time Customer Service Officer

·    0.4 FTE, in the form a Development Enquiry Officer 2 days per week is recommended at this stage.

 

Hours of operation:

 

5 days/week, Monday to Friday 8am - 4:30pm.

The proposed opening hours harmonise the proposed Community Service Centre with Customer Service operating hours and ensure ease of rostering for management of staff.

 

 

 

 

Services to be provided:

 

Administrative and Contact Centre services provided from the proposed Community Service Centres would include:

·  General information and customer requests for:

Waste Enquiries (missed service, household clean-up bookings etc.)

Duty Planner Services

General Enquiries/Information provided

Finance & Rates Enquiries

Planning & Development

Parks & Recreation

Compliance & Environment

Property & Facilities

Road Maintenance

Community Development

Corporate Services

·  Complaints and feedback

·  Payments (EFTPOS, cheque, invoicing)

·  Application enquiries

·  Viewing of Council documents on public exhibition

·  Webchat services

 

Other Considerations

 

·    Security - CCTV would be need to be considered at the Wentworthville Community Centre Hub.

 

·    Timeline - Council’s Facilities and Information Systems teams require approximately 3 months to complete the works required to prepare the Wentworthville Community Centre hub site for operation enabling the above services to be delivered.

 

·    Place Management – Whilst it is recognised that Place Management team function across the wider Cumberland Local Government Area, it is envisaged that this function will operate out of the Berala Community centre at times.

 

The Berala Community Centre requires no modification or IT infrastructure and is fit for purpose immediately, subject to the recruitment of the required staff.

Community Engagement

Council has undertaken significant community engagement to inform the development of Council’s Customer Experience Strategy, Library Strategy and Community Facilities Strategy. Each of these strategies identify service delivery to be a key priority. They also identify opportunities to ensure customer interaction points are accessible and harmonised, and further identify opportunities for expansion.

Policy Implications

Council’s Customer Experience Strategy 2018 - 2021 identifies “investigating and implementing the expansion of customer service functions to other areas within Council including community hubs and libraries” as a key project for 2020/2021.

Risk Implications

There are a number of risks associated with further expansion of administrative services beyond what is currently offered. These include:

·   The need for additional staff, equipment and technology which are not currently funded in Council’s approved Operational Plan budget for 2020/21;

·   The potential development of the future Wentworthville Community Hub is a consideration and could impact on the continuity of services from this location.

Financial Implications

Further expansion of administrative services beyond what is currently offered at Council’s Service Centres would require additional staff, training, resources and equipment.

Should Council proceed to implement an additional service centre at Wentworthville, a one off fitout cost of approximately $80,000 would be required, as well as recurrent staffing costs of approximately $200,000 per annum.

Should Council wish to proceed to implement an additional service centre at Berala, no fitout cost would be required, however, a recurrent staffing cost of approximately $120,000 per annum would be required.

The above costs are not currently funded in Council’s approved Operational Plan budget for 2020/21 and should Council wish to proceed with either option, a funding source would need to be identified.

CONCLUSION

 

Council currently provides on-site, face to face customer service functions from three locations distributed across the Cumberland LGA.  Council has identified the need to further expand presence and key administrative services across the Cumberland LGA

 

Both options presented in this report would improve Council’s presence and access to key administrative services in these locations subject to budget identification.

 

 

Attachments

1.     Cumberland LGA Map  

2.     Cost Summary   

 


DOCUMENTS
ASSOCIATED WITH
REPORT C09/20-550

Attachment 1

Cumberland LGA Map


Council Meeting

 16 September 2020

PDF Creator


DOCUMENTS
ASSOCIATED WITH
REPORT C09/20-550

Attachment 2

Cost Summary


Council Meeting

 16 September 2020

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Council Meeting

 16 September 2020

 

 

Item No: C09/20-551

Cumberland City Council Community Grants Program

Responsible Division:                  Community and Organisation Development

Officer:                                      Director Community and Organisation Development

File Number:                              7942502

Community Strategic Plan Goal:  A great place to live  

 

 

Summary

The Cumberland Community Grants Program aims to support the delivery of services and programs that deliver social, economic, cultural, recreational and environmental benefits to the local community.

Recommendations for funding allocations for applications submitted in Round Two of the Community Grants Program 2019/20 were considered at the Ordinary Meeting of Council held on 20 May 2020. Council resolved ‘that the matter be deferred until post Covid-19’ (Min.684, Item C05/20-428). 

 

This report presents the deferred applications submitted for the determination of Council and a proposed focus for the Cumberland Community Grants Program in 2020/21.

RECOMMENDATION

That Council:

1.     Advise all applicants that in light of Council’s current financial situation no money will be allocated to any of the projects recommended for funding in Round Two of the Community Grants Program 2019/20.

2.     Provide feedback and support to all applicants about other available grant opportunities.

3.     Adopt a revised focus for the 2020/21 Cumberland Community Grants Program to provide small grants to support community organisations in their emergency response to local community needs as a result of COVID-19.

4.     Implement a process whereby, on an annual basis, at the commencement of each financial year, the focus for that year’s grants program be nominated having regard to the highest priority community needs and that this be reported to Council each year for adoption (noting that for this year’s program the grants focus on COVID-19 related support, as outlined in (3) above).

 

 

Report

Background

 

Round Two of the Community Grants Program 2019/2020 was open from 29 January until 26 February 2020 with an advertised funding pool of $401,560 available. Council received a total of 85 applications across five funding streams (Community Events, Community Festival, Celebrating Cumberland, Community Participation, Creative Cumberland, Minor Capital Works, Small Equipment and Rising Star Sports Award). 40 applications were recommended for funding valued at $154,382. The schedule provided in Attachment 1 provides a summary of the original assessment outcomes.

At the Ordinary Meeting of Council held on 20 May 2020, when considering recommendations for funding allocations under Round Two of the Community Grants Program 2019/20, Council resolved ‘that the matter be deferred until post Covid-19’ (Min.684, Item C05/20-428). 

The 85 applicants were subsequently notified that a final decision had not been made on the outcome of funding applications and determination of Round Two of the grants program had been put on hold.

The pending applications which were deferred at the Council meeting held 20 May 2020, are re-presented to Council for determination. However it should be noted that no grant funds were rolled over from the 2019/2020 Community Grants Program in the 2020/21 budget.

During this time, Council has also considered a number of applications under the Emergency Relief Fund. Through this fund, $25,410 of funding has been granted to five organisations to support vulnerable community members affected by the COVID-19 pandemic.

In light of Council’s current financial situation and the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, it is therefore recommended that Council advise all applicants under Round Two of the Community Grants Program 2019/20 that the grant round has been cancelled and no money will be allocated to any of the projects recommended for funding.

Recommendations for Community Grants Program 2020/2021

An annual funding pool of $50,000 is budgeted for the 2020/2021 Community Grants Program in the adopted Operational Plan. 

The following recommendations for the Grants Program are presented for Council’s consideration:

·    That the 2020/21 Community Grants Program focus on small grants which support community organisations to respond to local community needs relating to COVID-19.

·    That one round of the program be delivered and scheduled to complement the timing of the Cumberland ClubGRANTS Scheme, with proposed timeframes as outlined below:

 

2020/21 Community Grants Program

ClubGRANTS 2021

27 January - 24 February 2021

April - May 2021

Applications will be made via a simple, streamlined application process and be assessed by a panel of Subject Matter Experts in accordance with the Community Grants and Donations Policy and the established criteria outlined in the publicised Guidelines. A recommendation will be reported to Council for consideration.

It is proposed that the above approach be undertaken on an annual basis with a revised focus adopted for grants support in any given year. Considering the fact that the available community grants funding has been significantly reduced, it is apparent that having a concerted focus on an area of emerging community need and priority is needed to ensure the best use of Council resources and in managing community expectations and understanding of the revised program and how it will operate. For the first year (2020/21), a focus on providing support to organisations assisting the community with needs related to the COVID-19 pandemic is recommended.

 

Council will continue to provide ongoing support through the Grant Support Program including:

·    Monthly grants bulletin with Council and non-Council funding opportunities

·    Information sessions (video conference)

·    Tailored 1:1 Advisory Desk sessions prior to submission of grant application

·    Feedback summary which includes the strengths and weaknesses of each grant round. Successful applicants are also included.

Community Engagement

Council will notify all 85 applicants of the outcome of the Round Two Grant Round and provide information about other available grant opportunities.

Policy Implications

The Community Grants and Donations Policy outlines the framework under which all grants and donations made by Council to the community are governed. All applications submitted under the Community Grants Program will be assessed in accordance with this Policy to ensure Council meets legislative requirements as prescribed in Section 356 of the Local Government Act 1993.

Risk Implications

The Community Grants Program is one of three financial assistance programs provided by Council and governed by the Community Grants and Donations Policy. The Community Grants Program Guidelines will ensure Council is compliant with the provisions of Section 356 of the Local Government Act 1993, thereby providing a clear and transparent process for applications for financial assistance under the
Community Grants Program.

Financial Implications

An annual funding pool of $50,000 for the Community Grants Program has been allocated in the Draft Operational Plan 2020/2021 budget.

CONCLUSION

Determination of the deferred applications submitted in Round Two of the Community Grants Program 2019/20 are presented for Council’s consideration together with a proposed focus for the Cumberland Community Grants Program in 2020/21.

 

Attachments

1.     Community Grants Program Round Two 2019/2020 - Schedule of Applications Received   

 


DOCUMENTS
ASSOCIATED WITH
REPORT C09/20-551

Attachment 1

Community Grants Program Round Two 2019/2020 - Schedule of Applications Received


Council Meeting

 16 September 2020

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Council Meeting

 16 September 2020

 

 

Item No: C09/20-552

IPART Domestic Waste Management Charges Submission

Responsible Division:                  Finance & Governance

Officer:                                      Director Finance & Governance

File Number:                              8424445

Community Strategic Plan Goal:  A clean and green community  

 

 

Summary

The Independent Pricing and Regulatory Tribunal of New South Wales (IPART) is currently reviewing the domestic waste management (DWM) service charges levied by local councils in NSW. Comments and submissions on IPART’s Discussion Paper, released 18 August 2020, are due by 6 October 2020.

 

Recommendation

That Council endorse the provision of a submission and attachment on IPART’s Discussion Paper ‘Local Council Domestic Waste Management Charges’ based on the information in this report.

 

Report

IPART’s Discussion Paper ‘Local Council Domestic Waste Management Charges’ calls for submissions on three (3) core issues and responses to thirteen (13) specific questions listed in Section 1.5.

The Discussion Paper is located on IPART’s website, on the following webpage:

https://www.ipart.nsw.gov.au/Home/Industries/Local-Government/Reviews/Domestic-Waste-Management-Service-Charges/Review-of-domestic-waste-management-service-charges

In addition to this waste discussion, there are numerous challenges relating to cost leadership for services within the local government sector. The accuracy of the Local Cost Index for rates income has been inadequate as it does not reflect the true cost of the responsibilities borne by the local government sector.

Given the challenges, it is evident that funding arrangements for Council are inadequate. These include the following:

·    Rate Capping

·    Federal Grants Assistance

·    Domestic Waste Pricing

·    User pay charges, where a service is delivered at a substantial subsidy.

IPART’s Discussion Paper seeks to implement new regulations. The analysis however is inadequate as it fails to consider all costs borne by Councils. The local government sector is experiencing a financial sustainability crisis. This is reflected on page 18 of the Discussion Paper, where IPART recognises some waste costs could be funded by either the Waste Income or Rates Income. This approach cannot work as there is no legislation that allows Council to make that decision; A Special Rate Variation (SRV) would be required, which is a costly and lengthy exercise.

Rate Peg Issue

The NSW Productivity Commission’s Green Paper on productivity reform, ‘Continuing the Productivity Conversation’, states the following on page 267:

 “Population growth is driving demand for new infrastructure (such as roads, parks, sewerage and street lighting) and services (such as waste collection and recycling and use of community facilities). As the rate peg system does not currently compensate councils for having to service a larger pool of ratepayers, this leaves local governments with insufficient revenue to meet demand and an incentive to avoid housing growth.”

Another major challenge not discussed in IPART’s Discussion Paper is the NSW EPA Levy of $146 per tonne (55% of total tipping costs), which for Cumberland is $11m per annum paid for by ratepayers. The expenditure of this Levy is not regulated by the State Government and a large portion is not being reinvested in waste services.

Consequently, when the Discussion Paper compares the fees charged, it should consider that ratepayers have already contributed to the under investment of the EPA Levy and will now pay again as the cost of tipping for recyclables is increasing due to a lack of competition and market failure.

The increase in tipping fees for yellow bin waste has increased from a subsidy to a projected large cost per tonne. This is a cost of $2.0m over the last few years which cannot be accurately captured in the analysis. Therefore, the analysis the Discussion Paper relies on is not in alignment with Council’s views.

Submission

Council’s primary submission is per Section 1.5 of IPART Discussion Paper relating to Domestic Waste.

Council will also submit an additional attachment for further information.

 

 

 

 

         ITEM

COUNCIL’S RESPONSE

Whether stakeholders consider that there are issues with the prices charged for DWM services, and, if so, how we should respond, e.g., whether any regulatory (or other) action is required.

Council believes there should be a fee for service model that targets the use of the services and is not based on the availability of services.

Council does not support further regulation at this point in time.

Potential options if regulatory action is required, noting that we would favour a less prescriptive approach. A proposed regulatory approach may include developing, in consultation with stakeholders:

- A reporting, monitoring and benchmarking regime to develop a publicly available comparison tool comparing DWM charges for equivalent services across comparable councils.

- A publicly available centralised comprehensive register of successful tender contract values for DWM services across councils.

Pricing principles for DWM charges, to provide guidance to councils in setting DWM charges.

Council supports the benchmarking criteria if it is done on the basis of Litre Capacity offered. The benchmarking would need to consider contracted waste versus in-house waste tipping services.

 

Council supports this process, noting there are challenges in:

·   Commercial in Confidence discussions with private operators.

·   Length and timing of contracts due to the issues relevant at the time the contract is signed.

·   Disclosure of tipping service method being used.

The current pricing principles are sound. There are concerns in the review around cost principles. Council believes the cost principles need to align to 1997 Guideline to Competitive Neutrality and this should be used for all the services delivered by Council.

This will allow Council to compare a range of services in a consistent way.

The proposed pricing principles presented in Chapter 3.

Section 3.1 “DWM charges should reflect a ‘user pays’ approach”

Council supports the principle that the fee should be a user pay service.

3.1a)  Incremental (additional) 18 cost allocation for DWM services

Council disagrees with this. The cost principles should be aligned with the existing ‘Pricing and Costing for Council Business, July 1997’.

This s23a Guideline states a cost allocation system is based on a fair share of the costs. The allocation of costs should be on a reliable basis.

Therefore, an initial independent review would be the best way to address this issue. Introducing a new and confusing system will only cause misunderstandings and disruption.

3.2 “Only reasonable cost categories should be reflected in DWM charges”

Council agrees in principle with the categories of costs and can confirm this is Cumberland’s current practice.

Council disagrees with any use of the reference ‘Incremental Costs’ unless the rate cap can be increased for an equivalent amount so we are no worse off.

3.3 “DWM charges should reflect efficient costs”

Council agrees in principle, noting the market is deregulated and Council can only negotiate the most efficient price based on our current expenditure, or through work with WSROC or LGP, for opportunities to achieve value for money.

3.4 “DWM charges should be transparent”

Council agrees with this and would encourage transparency as long as the comparisons are fair, consistent and effective.

3.5 “DWM charges should seek to ensure price stability”

Council agrees in principle. This is not being achieved at Cumberland at the moment, as the Waste Reserve is insufficient to allow Council to absorb the current increases in tipping costs well beyond CPI.

 

Further to the core submission, Council has also prepared a more detailed response to the thirteen questions (see Attachment 1).

Community Engagement

There are no consultation processes for Council associated with this report.

Policy Implications

There are no policy implications for Council associated with this report.

Risk Implications

There are no risk implications for Council associated with this report.

Financial Implications

There are no financial implications for Council associated with this report.

CONCLUSION

Submissions on IPART’s Discussion Paper ‘Local Council Domestic Waste Management Charges’ are due by 6 October 2020. This report has been prepared to ensure Council can meet the 6 October 2020 deadline. Like the Rates Review, Council supports sensible reform that improves efficiency and uses a consistent approach to cost management.

 

Attachments

1.     IPART Discussion Paper - Section 1.5 - Detailed Responses   

 


DOCUMENTS
ASSOCIATED WITH
REPORT C09/20-552

Attachment 1

IPART Discussion Paper - Section 1.5 - Detailed Responses


Council Meeting

 16 September 2020

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Council Meeting

 16 September 2020

 

 

Item No: C09/20-553

Investment Report - August 2020

Responsible Division:                  Finance & Governance

Officer:                                      Director Finance & Governance

File Number:                              A-05-01/05

Community Strategic Plan Goal:  Transparent and accountable leadership  

 

 

Summary

This is a report from the Director Finance & Governance providing an update on the performance of Council’s investment portfolio to 31 August 2020.

 

Recommendation

That Council receive the 31 August Investment Report. 

 

Report

 

Included in this report are the following items that highlight Council’s investment portfolio performance for the month, year-to-date to 31 August 2020 and an update of the investment environment.

 

Council Investments as at 31 August 2020

 

Council’s investment portfolio has a current market value of $159,675,985. This represents a premium of $1,370,028 above the face value of the portfolio being $158,305,957 and generates a 2.37% average purchase yield. The following table reflects Council’s holding in various investment categories.

 

 

 

 

Investment Portfolio Performance

 

The investment returns for the month, year-to-date of 31 August outperformed the current month benchmark and exceeded the Year to date benchmark.

 

Performance – Current Month 31 August 2020

 

For the month of August, Council‘s portfolio generated interest earnings of $218,847. This is $13,014 higher than the budget of $218,847 and outperformed the AusBond Bank Bill Index by 2.00%, as detailed below:-

 

 

Performance – Year-to-date 31 August 2020

 

For the year-to-date, Council‘s portfolio generated interest earnings of $460,516. This is $48,849 higher than the budget of $411,667 and outperformed the AusBond Bank Bill Index by 0.52%, as per below:-

Community Engagement

There are no consultation processes for Council associated with this report.

Policy Implications

There are no policy implications for Council associated with this report.

Risk Implications

To manage risk, key criteria are incorporated into Cumberland Council’s investment making decisions, as detailed below:-

Preservation of Capital

The requirement for preventing losses in an investment portfolio’s total value (considering the time value of money).

Diversification

Setting limits to the amounts invested with a particular financial institution or government authority to reduce credit risk.

 

 

Credit Risk

The risk that an investment of Council fails to pay the interest and/or repay the principal of an investment.

Maturity Risk

The longer the term of the investment, the greater the exposure to potential changes in interest rates, market volatility and credit quality of an issuer.

Financial Implications

There are no financial implications for Council associated with this report.

CONCLUSION

Council hereby certifies that the investments listed above have been made in accordance with Section 625 of the Local Government Act 1993, Clause 212 of the Local Government (General) Regulation 2005 and Council’s Investment Policy.

 

Attachments

1.     Investment Report Summary August 2020  

2.     Investment Report Commentary August 2020   

 


DOCUMENTS
ASSOCIATED WITH
REPORT C09/20-553

Attachment 1

Investment Report Summary August 2020


Council Meeting

 16 September 2020

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DOCUMENTS
ASSOCIATED WITH
REPORT C09/20-553

Attachment 2

Investment Report Commentary August 2020


Council Meeting

 16 September 2020

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Council Meeting

 16 September 2020

 

 

Item No: C09/20-554

Monthly Management Accounts July 2020

Responsible Division:                  Finance & Governance

Officer:                                      Director Finance & Governance

File Number:                              HC-06-13-22

Community Strategic Plan Goal:  Transparent and accountable leadership  

 

 

Summary

The purpose of this report is providing increased transparency around the financial performance of Council’s directorates.

 

Recommendation

That Council receive the information contained in this report.

 

Report

 

The following is the year-to-date (YTD) July 2020 report for Council and attached are the directorate reports. The following table provides a summary of YTD Actual against approved budget. The Actual YTD is favourable to the approved budget by $4.48 million as at 31 July 2020.

 

Council adopted on 20 May 2020 a financial recovery strategy that requires Employee Savings $4.5m for the year and a delay in capital $15m. The only portion of the July variance that we can include as a genuine savings is the Employee Costs savings $0.9m which is 20% of the target. This savings was in line with expectation, as excess leave savings which are $2m of 4.5m can be only achieved in the first 3 months during the COVID restrictions. Once we reach summer months there will be no likely savings due to work demands.

 

The remaining budget variances are timing differences as discussed below and will not assist in budget recovery. They will need to be monitored and reported against in Quarterly Review. Council has also received a prepaid Finance Assistance Grants (FAGs) grant of $3.9m, which remains a financial challenge that must be kept in mind as the financial year continues.

Discussion July Year-to-date

Operating Income YTD $147.2m, $2.789m higher than budget.

There are three large variances which offset each other and contribute to the $2.8m budget result:

·    Waste Fees $1.3m – The variance relates to additional levies for Waste, which is often due to residential growth. This income will be offset over the year with additional Waste costs to fund the increases in services. The net proceeds from Waste are allocated to the Waste Reserve.

·    Rates Income $0.4m – Higher due to carry over from previous years for supplementary rates.

·    Operating Grants $(1.4)m – Offset by lower user fees for Childcare $0.5m, resulting in a net increase $0.9m. The variance is due to a timing difference $0.9m in the Ombudsman and Finance areas.

Operating Expenses YTD $14.8m, $1.9m better than budget.

The expenses are $1.9m lower than the budget due to the following:

·    Employee Costs $0.9m – There is an expectation that Council can save $3.5m per annum due to lower CPI, Vacancy and Leave (Jul-Sep). This is part of the savings program.

·    Contracts $0.9m – Savings in the Works and Infrastructure Directorate, which are timing differences.  

·    Borrowing Costs $0.2m – Lower cost due COVID-19 arrangement on loan account.

The largest portion of the favourable variance is due to timing differences. The Employee Costs $0.9m are genuine savings.

Community Engagement

There are no consultation processes for Council associated with this report.

Policy Implications

There are no policy implications for Council associated with this report.

Risk Implications

There are no risk implications for Council associated with this report.

Financial Implications

There are no financial implications for Council associated with this report. This will contribute to the Quarter 1 Financial Review Statement.

CONCLUSION

The July year-to-date recurring budget position is 3.9% favourable to the budget. The savings in total employment costs have continued as reported in May 2020.

 

Attachments

1.     July 2020 Directorate Reports   

 


DOCUMENTS
ASSOCIATED WITH
REPORT C09/20-554

Attachment 1

July 2020 Directorate Reports


Council Meeting

 16 September 2020



Council Meeting

 16 September 2020

 

 

Item No: C09/20-555

Planning Proposal - Fresh Hope Site, Dunmore Street, Pendle Hill

Responsible Division:                  Environment & Planning

Officer:                                      Director Environment & Planning

File Number:                              PP2020/0012

Community Strategic Plan Goal:  A resilient built environment  

 

 

Summary

This planning proposal seeks to amend the Holroyd Local Environmental Plan 2013 for the Fresh Hope site at Dunmore Street, Pendle Hill, to:

·    Rezone part of the site from R2 Low Density Residential and R3 Medium Density Residential to R4 High Density Residential and RE2 Private Recreation

·    Amend the maximum height of building controls that apply to the site from 9 metres and 11 metres to 12.5 metres to 32 metres

·    Amend the floor space ratio controls that apply to the site from 0.5:1, 0:7:1 and 0.85:1 to 0.85:1 and 1.5:1

·    Introduce a Schedule 1 amendment to permit ‘food and drink premises’ and ‘medical centre’ as additional permitted uses.

The proposal has been placed on preliminary public exhibition (pre-Gateway), and was reported to the Cumberland Local Planning Panel in August 2020. The Panel supported the Council officer recommendation to proceed to a Gateway determination. The Panel also provided further advice for consideration as part of the planning proposal and this is outlined in the report.

It is recommended that the planning proposal be forwarded to the Department of Planning, Industry and Environment for a Gateway Determination. Should a Gateway Determination be received, further work on a site specific Development Control Plan and Voluntary Planning Agreement will be undertaken.

 

Recommendation

That Council:

1.     Endorse a planning proposal for the Fresh Hope site at Dunmore Street,  Pendle Hill, that seeks to amend the Holroyd Local Environmental Plan 2013 to:

a.  Rezone part of the site from R2 Low Density Residential and R3 Medium Density Residential to R4 High Density Residential and RE2 Private Recreation

b.  Amend the Height of Building control for the site from 9m and 11m to 12.5m and 32m

c.  Amend the Floor Space Ratio control for the site from 0.5:1, 0:7:1 and 0.85:1 to 0.85:1 and 1.5:1

d.  Amend Schedule 1 to permit ‘food and drink premises’ and ‘medical centre’ as additional permitted uses on the site.

2.     Endorse that the planning proposal for the Fresh Hope site at Dunmore Street, Pendle Hill, be forwarded to the Department of Planning, Industry and Environment for a Gateway Determination. 

3.     Prepare a site specific Development Control Plan and Voluntary Planning Agreement to derive public benefit, should a Gateway Determination be received.

 

Report

Background

The planning proposal request for the Fresh Hope site at Dunmore Street, Pendle Hill, was lodged in April 2020. The proposal seeks to facilitate the redevelopment of the site for a new and expanded seniors’ housing development with a greater mix of land uses including a residential aged care facility, independent living units, affordable key worker housing, community facilities, allied health services and publicly accessible open space. This will be achieved by amending the Holroyd LEP 2013, to:

·    Rezone part of the site from R2 Low Density Residential and R3 Medium Density Residential to R4 High Density Residential and RE2 Private Recreation

·    Amend the maximum height of building controls that apply to the site from 9 metres and 11 metres to 12.5 metres to 32 metres

·    Amend the FSR controls that apply to the site from 0.5:1, 0:7:1 and 0.85:1 to 0.85:1 and 1.5:1

·    Introduce a Schedule 1 amendment to permit ‘food and drink premises’ and ‘medical centre’ as additional permitted uses on the site.

The status of the planning proposal is outlined in Figure 1.

Figure 1 Planning Proposal Status

The site and its context

The site is located on the corner of Dunmore Street and Pendle Way, Pendle Hill. The site is rectangular in shape and comprises of ten lots, being Lots 1 and 2, 8-12 DP 24728, Lot 2 and 3 DP 5545208, Lot A DP 335578, Lot 472 DP 1204429, with a total area of 7.3Ha.

The site (as shown in Figure 2) is currently occupied by an existing senior’s housing development that is operated by Fresh Hope Care and comprises of a residential aged care facility with capacity for 190 residents, 86 independent living units and a place of public worship (Pathways Community Church). There are six single-storey residential dwellings along Pendle Way that also form part of the site.

The site has a street frontage to Dunmore Street of approximately 330 metres and street frontage to Pendle Way of 220 metres. There are a number vehicular access points from Dunmore Street and Pendle Way into the site. A footpath provides pedestrian access from the bus stop on Pendle Way into the centre of the site.

The site has a fall of approximately 11.5m to the east along the north south axis, with the highest topographical point being at Dunmore House and the lowest point being at the corner of Dunmore Street and Pendle Way. There is also a fall to the Bonds Spinning Mills site.

Figure 2 The Subject Site

Local Context

The site is located approximately 300 metres from the Pendle Hill local centre and train station.  Surrounding development includes:

·    A mix of low density residential dwellings and low rise 3 storey residential flat buildings on Pendle Way.

·    Low rise 3 storey residential flat buildings on Dunmore Street.

·    Low density residential dwellings on Collins Street and Rowley Street.

The Bonds Spinning Mill site that adjoins the eastern boundary and comprises of industrial warehouse buildings, however, this will evolve into a high density residential living environment when redeveloped.

Regional Context

The site is located in the suburb of Pendle Hill which is 4.5 kilometres west of Parramatta CBD (refer to Figure 3) and 25 kilometres west of the Sydney CBD.

Wentworthville local centre and Wentworthville train station are located approximately 1.5 kilometres to the east. The Westmead Health and Education Precinct is located approximately 3 kilometres to the east.

 

Figure 3 Regional Context

Planning Controls

Current Planning Controls

The site is zoned R2 Low Density Residential, R3 Medium Density Residential and R4 High Density Residential, Maximum Height of Building controls of 9m and 11m and Floor Space Ration controls of 0.5:1, 0.7:1 and 0.85:1 applying across the site. The site contains two local heritage items: Dunmore House (I94) and Ashwood House, (I95). The adjoining Bonds Spinning Mills is identified as an archaeological site and includes a heritage item. These controls are shown graphically in Figures 4 to 7.

 

Figure 4 Current Land Zoning (LZN) Map

Figure 5 Current Floor Space Ratio (FSR) Map

Figure 6 Current Height of Building (HoB) Map

Figure 7 Current Heritage Items

Planning Proposal Request

The Planning Proposal Request seeks to amend the Holroyd LEP 2013 to:

·    Rezone the site to R4 High Density Residential and RE2 Private Recreation

·    Amend the maximum height of building controls to 12.5 metres and 32 metres

·    Amend the FSR controls to 0.85:1 and 1.5:1

·    Introduce a Schedule 1 amendment to permit ‘food and drink premises’ and ‘medical centre’.

The changes to planning controls identified in the Planning Proposal Request is outlined in Figures 8 to 11.

Figure 8 Proposed Land Use Zone (LZN) Map

Figure 9 Proposed Floor Space Ratio (FSR) Map

Figure 10 Proposed Height of Buildings (HoB) Map

Figure 11 Additional Permitted Use (APU) Map

The intended outcome of the Planning Proposal is to facilitate redevelopment of the site for the purpose of a seniors living development, as outlined in the indicative masterplan provided in Figure 12, including:

·    Buildings of up to 8 storeys in height, comprising an indicative total of 650 independent living units and affordable housing units and a 240-bed residential aged care facility

·    Approximately 755 m2 of community facilities floor space in the heritage listed Dunmore House and approximately 1,120 m2 of non-residential floor space in the heritage listed Ashwood House

·    Basement level car parking to meet the required car parking demand

·    Approximately 51,709 m2 (70% of the total site area) of open space (including publicly accessible communal and private open space), with the retention of significant vegetation on the site

·    New publicly accessible spaces throughout the site featuring new or upgraded vehicle and pedestrian through-site links.

Figure 12 Indicative Masterplan

Advice from the Cumberland Local Planning Panel

The planning proposal was reported to the Cumberland Local Planning Panel on 12 August 2020. The Cumberland Local Planning Panel recommended that the Planning Proposal Request be reported to Council, seeking a resolution to forward a Planning Proposal to the Department of Planning, Industry and Environment for a Gateway Determination, subject to the following comments and considerations:

a.  The Panel is of the view that the Council should consider an RE1 zoning rather than RE2. However, should the Council be of the view that RE2 is more appropriate the Panel would urge the Council to require an easement for public access to this part of the site and the heritage buildings. In addition, the Panel is of the opinion that Dunmore House should be utilised as a community facility.

b.  Given that the detailed, peer reviewed design analysis accompanying the planning proposal responds to the site specific heritage and contextual conditions through a wide range of heights (generally between 4 and 8 storeys) across the site, it appears more appropriate to apply a range of heights in the LEP more reflective of this design approach, rather than a single height (reflecting the greatest identified height) across the whole site.  This would appear to be more consistent with the approach taken for the adjoining Bonds site.

This is particularly the case given that the Panel was advised that it is intended that a site specific DCP will be prepared to accompany the planning proposal and there should be consistency between the LEP and DCP height controls.

Any such differentiated height controls should also trigger a review of the FSR standard to ensure there are no internal inconsistencies between the height and FSR standards across the various parts of the site.

The Panel is also of the view that a height limit of 32m is in excess of what is required for an 8 storey building.

Council officers have considered the advice from the Cumberland Local Planning Panel and the response is provided in Table 1. 

Public Benefit Offer

The proponent has proposed a public benefit offer that may include:

·    The provision of affordable housing for low or very low-income households, and/or

·    The provision and ongoing maintenance of landscaping, public footpath linkages and public furniture within the publicly accessible open space, including the open space curtilage, and/or

·    The refurbishment, ongoing maintenance and provision of community related uses at Dunmore House, and/or

·    A substantial area of publicly accessible open space to be zoned RE2 Private Recreation and comprising Dunmore House and its curtilage.

Should Council endorse that the proposal proceed to a Gateway Determination, Council will negotiate a Voluntary Planning Agreement with the proponent to ensure that any public offer for the site maximises outcomes for the wider community and is consistent with the Cumberland Planning Agreements Policy.

 

Panel Advice

Council Officer Response

Council to consider a RE1 Public Recreation zoning rather than the R2 Private Recreation zoning

·    The difference between the RE1 zoning and RE2 zoning is the ownership of the site, rather than the intended use of the site

·    The location of the recreation zoning is part of the heritage curtilage, which would restrict the  type of embellishment that would be allowed

·    If a RE1 zoning was adopted, Council would be responsible for acquisition and ongoing maintenance, with associated financial impacts

·    Public access to this part of the site can be achieved under continued ownership by Fresh Hope as part of the Development Control Plan and/or Voluntary Planning Agreement

Dunmore House should be utilised as a community facility

·    Council officers have already undertaken preliminary consideration of the use of Dunmore House as a community facility, and this can be further investigated should a Gateway Determination be received on the proposal

·    Access to Dunmore House as a community facility under continued ownership by Fresh Hope is possible through a Voluntary Planning Agreement. Council’s existing booking mechanisms could be used should Dunmore House be available as a community facility

Built form controls for the site

·    It is acknowledged that the former Bonds Spinning Mills site (which is adjacent to the site) has differentiated height controls in the LEP. However, the use of a site specific Development Control Plan to manage height provides a more flexible approach and is consistent with a recent planning proposal endorsed by Council for a similar type of development

·    The comments made by the Panel that a height limit of 32m is in excess of what is required for an 8 storey building is noted.  In this case, aged care facilities require higher floor to floor heights to accommodate furnishings and the required equipment compared to normal residential uses. For an eight storey building on site, advice from Fresh Hope indicates that the ground floor and roof level are each 4.5m in height, with other levels each being 3.2m in height

Table 1 Council Officer Response to Cumberland Local Planning Panel Advice

Strategic Merit Assessment

There is strategic merit in progressing the proposal to the next phase of assessment based on the following grounds.

Economic and Social Benefits

·    There are significant opportunities for aged care and retirement living in the Cumberland area, with unmet demand for 4,320 aged care beds and 2,110 retirement living dwellings by 2036. The proposed redevelopment’s net addition of 50 aged care beds and approximately 564 dwellings contributes in meeting this forecast demand

·    The proposed café is likely to complement rather than compete with similar nearby businesses. Economic analysis submitted to support the proposal predicts that 80% of all sales at the proposed café would be from within the proposed development. This indicates that the proposed development would not have an impact on the viability of nearby centres including Pendle Hill, the Bonds site and Wentworthville

·    The proposed medical centre is likely to complement rather than compete with nearby businesses. The medical suites (or consulting rooms) at the proposed redevelopment will host visiting GPs and allied health professionals by appointment (usually organised by the facility’s management on a set schedule) and as such will not be utilised by non-residents. This indicates a low level of impact on medical facilities in Pendle Hill and Wentworthville

·    The retirement living and aged care facility would generate approximately 320 direct ongoing jobs, plus a further 290 indirect jobs located in the wider economy

·    The proposal will involve the investment of hundreds of millions of dollars on site and support an estimated 140 full time equivalent direct construction-related jobs per year, and a further 430 full time equivalent indirect jobs elsewhere in the economy

·    The proposal is likely to add approximately 930 new permanent residents to the area (excluding aged care residents) and 320 workers who can contribute to the local economy through spending in nearby centres including Pendle Hill, Wentworthville and the adjoining Bonds site.

Built Form

·    The increase in scale and density of development on the site is balanced through the design and siting of the proposed buildings and the provision of appropriate setbacks and gradual height transitions.

·    The proposed setbacks (particularly along Collins Street) will ensure an appropriate interface with the adjoining low density residential dwellings to the South. This will be achieved by providing a minimum of 6 metres for the first two storeys and a minimum of 8 storeys for the partial third storey. A 6m deep soil planting zone has also been proposed to facilitate a ‘green screen’ along the southern boundary.

·    The proposed site-specific development control plan provides certainty that the key elements of the masterplan will be implemented even if the site is sold to another owner, which is considered unlikely.

Heritage

 

·    The established heritage curtilage around both Dunmore House and Ashwood House provides adequate separation between the indicative built forms to negate the impact of the change to the LEP controls (see Figure 13).

Figure 13 Existing Heritage Items and Curtilage

·    The proposed incorporation of a through-site link to the former Bonds Spinning Mills site reinforces the historic relationship between the two sites.

Traffic

·    The proposal is not expected to compromise the safety or function of the surrounding road network. On any weekday or Saturday peak hour, the site is expected to generate between 135 and 145 vehicle trips (90 to 100 more vehicle trips than the existing facility).

Greater Sydney Region Plan

The proposal is consistent with the following objectives of the Greater Sydney Region Plan:

·    Objective 10 – Greater housing supply as the proposal will increase the supply of housing for aged care and people with a disability.

·    Objective 11 – Housing is more diverse and affordable as the proposal will deliver accessible housing to a broad spectrum of seniors housing to cater for an ageing population.

Central City District Plan

The proposal is consistent with the following Planning Priorities of the Central City District Plan:

·    Planning Priority C4 – Fostering healthy, creative, culturally rich and socially connected communities, as the site is well connected to a number of strategic and local centres by public transport.

·    Planning Priority C5 – Providing housing supply, choice and affordability with access to jobs, service and public transport, as the proposal will contribute towards providing purpose built seniors housing to cater for an ageing population. The proposal will also increase the housing supply in the Cumberland area, assisting Council to meet its dwelling targets.

·    Planning Priority C20 – Adapting to the impacts urban and natural hazards and climate change, as the master plan assists to mitigate the urban heat island effect by increasing tree canopy cover on the site.

Cumberland 2030: Our Local Strategic Planning Statement

The proposal is consistent with the following key Local Planning Priorities:

·    Local Planning Priority 5 – Delivering hosing diversity to suit changing needs, as the proposal will supply increase housing options for an ageing population.

·    Local Planning Priority 6 – Deliver affordable housing suitable for the needs of all people at various stages of their lives, as the future redevelopment will incorporate a number of accommodation options to enable people form a variety of backgrounds and socio-economic status to age in place.

Recommended Planning Controls

A summary of the recommended planning controls for the proposal is provided in Table 2. This is based on a review of the proponent’s proposed planning controls by Council officers, and advice from the Cumberland Local Planning Panel.


 

 

Planning Controls (Holroyd LEP 2013)

Existing Controls

Proponent proposed controls

Cumberland Local Planning Panel advice

(August 2020)

Recommended planning controls

Zoning

R2 Low Density Residential

R3 Medium Density Residential

R4 High Density Residential

R4 High Density Residential

RE2 Private Recreation

R4 High Density Residential

Consider RE1 Public Recreation

R4 High Density Residential

RE2 Private Recreation

Height of Building

9 metres

11 metres

 

12.5 metres

32 metres

 

Varied height controls that permit 4-8 storey development

12.5 metres

32 metres

 

Floor Space Ratio

0.5:1

0.7:1

0.85:1

0.85:1

1.5:1

0.85:1

1.5:1

0.85:1

1.5:1

Additional Permitted Uses

N/A

Food and drink premises

Medical centre

Food and drink premises

Medical centre

Food and drink premises

Medical centre

Table 2 Recommended Planning Controls for Proposal

Next Steps

It is recommended that the planning proposal be forwarded to the Department of Planning, Industry and Environment for a Gateway Determination.

Should the proposal proceed to a Gateway Determination, negotiations regarding the public benefit offer will be progressed and captured through a Voluntary Planning Agreement in accordance with Council’s Planning Agreements Policy. A site specific Development Control Plan will also be prepared, with detailed controls on a range of items including building heights, building setbacks, recreation area and heritage.

Community Engagement

The Planning Proposal Request and supporting documents were exhibited for a period of 28 days, from 1 June 2020 to 29 June 2020 as required by Cumberland’s Planning Proposal Notification Policy. Council received a total of 23 submissions, including one submission in support from a Member of Parliament, Dr. Hugh McDermott MP, 17 in support and 5 objecting. Key issues are summarised below:

In Support

·    The proposal will significantly benefit the local community by increasing the supply of diverse housing options, facilitating intergenerational living

·    The site will be a genuine community hub for onsite residents and the surrounding community to come together, minimising social isolation

·    The sites close proximity to the train station will allow for increased mobility and access for the community

·    The proposal will deliver 320 direct jobs in aged care and retirement living and 290 indirect jobs. The future construction will involve the investment of hundreds of millions of dollars and will provide direct construction-related jobs and indirect jobs in the community.

Opposed

·    Pathways Community Church expressed strong opposition to any development that would remove the property and ministry without the due process of discussion and permission

·    Proposed building heights and density, especially in relation to privacy, overshadowing, traffic, parking and noise

·    Urban design consideration where a corridor created by the 2 storey high wall near Collins Street will create blind spot and lead to crime

·    Traffic impacts for roundabouts at Pendle Way/Magowar Road/Collins Street and Dunmore Street/Jones Street

·    Asbestos management during the redevelopment

·    Concerns about the safety and security of residents by opening the site up to the public.

General

·    Suggestion to relocate the entry/exit to Pendle Way

·    Request for RE1 Public Recreation instead of RE2 Private Recreation to ensure public access, better integration and connectivity between the site and adjoining Bonds site

·    Need for the protection and enhancement of views to and from Dunmore House

·    Voluntary Planning Agreement needs to provide better public outcomes and should be similar to the Agreement for the Bonds site.

No significant issues were raised that would require Council not to consider requesting a Gateway Determination for the Planning Proposal. The concerns regarding landowner permission associated with the Planning Proposal have been responded to separately by Council.

The planning proposal relates to changes in planning controls and does not involve a detailed assessment of any buildings or structures on the site. Issues raised in submissions, such as vehicular access, overshadowing, privacy and safety, will be considered and addressed as part of a future development application for the site.

Should Council endorse that the proposal proceed to a Gateway Determination, Council will negotiate a Voluntary Planning Agreement with the proponent to ensure that any public offer for the site maximises outcomes for the wider community and is consistent with the Cumberland Planning Agreements Policy.

Policy Implications

Policy implications for Council are outlined in the main body of the report.

Risk Implications

There are minimal risk implications for Council associated with the report.

Financial Implications

Should Council support a Gateway Determination for the proposal, a Voluntary Planning Agreement will be negotiated between Council and the applicant.

CONCLUSION

It is recommended that the Planning Proposal Request be reported to Council seeking a resolution that the Proposal be forwarded to the Department of Planning, Industry and Environment for a Gateway Determination. This recommendation is made as:

·    The proposal will increase the supply of seniors housing, residential aged care facilities and affordable key worker housing to meet forecast demand in the Cumberland area

·    The proposal will lead to the creation of a vibrant on-site community with the inclusion of an additional 930 new permanent residents within the independent living units, affordable key worker housing units and the residential aged care facility

·    The proposal has the potential for approximately 320 ongoing aged care and retirement living jobs on the subject site, with additional jobs generated throughout the wider local economy

·    The proposal will support the provision of new allied health services to support the on-site population

·    The proposal supports the retention and adaptive reuse of existing heritage buildings on the site, including the potential for Dunmore House to be provided for community related uses.

 

Should the proposal proceed to a Gateway Determination, negotiations regarding the public benefit offer will be progressed and captured through a Voluntary Planning Agreement in accordance with Council’s Planning Agreements Policy.  A site specific Development Control Plan will also be prepared.

 

Attachments

1.     Planning Proposal Request  

2.     Minutes from CLPP meeting 12 August 2020  

3.     Economic Assessment  

4.     Urban Design Report  

5.     Urban Design Peer Review  

6.     Transport Impact Assessment  

7.     Aboriginal Heritage Due Diligence  

8.     Historic Archaeology Assessment  

9.     Heritage Impact Statement  

10.   Preliminary Contamination Assessment  

11.   Social Impact Assessment and Management Plan  

12.   Summary of Submissions   

 


DOCUMENTS
ASSOCIATED WITH
REPORT C09/20-555

Attachment 1

Planning Proposal Request


Council Meeting

 16 September 2020

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DOCUMENTS
ASSOCIATED WITH
REPORT C09/20-555

Attachment 2

Minutes from CLPP meeting 12 August 2020


Council Meeting

 16 September 2020

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DOCUMENTS
ASSOCIATED WITH
REPORT C09/20-555

Attachment 3

Economic Assessment


Council Meeting

 16 September 2020

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DOCUMENTS
ASSOCIATED WITH
REPORT C09/20-555

Attachment 4

Urban Design Report


Council Meeting

 16 September 2020

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DOCUMENTS
ASSOCIATED WITH
REPORT C09/20-555

Attachment 5

Urban Design Peer Review


Council Meeting

 16 September 2020

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DOCUMENTS
ASSOCIATED WITH
REPORT C09/20-555

Attachment 6

Transport Impact Assessment


Council Meeting

 16 September 2020

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DOCUMENTS
ASSOCIATED WITH
REPORT C09/20-555

Attachment 7

Aboriginal Heritage Due Diligence


Council Meeting

 16 September 2020

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DOCUMENTS
ASSOCIATED WITH
REPORT C09/20-555

Attachment 8

Historic Archaeology Assessment


Council Meeting

 16 September 2020

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DOCUMENTS
ASSOCIATED WITH
REPORT C09/20-555

Attachment 9

Heritage Impact Statement


Council Meeting

 16 September 2020

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DOCUMENTS
ASSOCIATED WITH
REPORT C09/20-555

Attachment 10

Preliminary Contamination Assessment


Council Meeting

 16 September 2020

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DOCUMENTS
ASSOCIATED WITH
REPORT C09/20-555

Attachment 11

Social Impact Assessment and Management Plan


Council Meeting

 16 September 2020

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DOCUMENTS
ASSOCIATED WITH
REPORT C09/20-555

Attachment 12

Summary of Submissions


Council Meeting

 16 September 2020

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Council Meeting

 16 September 2020

 

 

Item No: C09/20-556

Road Naming Proposal – Margaret Street, Merrylands

Responsible Division:                  Environment & Planning

Officer:                                      Director Environment & Planning

File Number:                              S-30-01/06

Community Strategic Plan Goal:  A resilient built environment  

 

 

Summary

This report seeks Council’s endorsement to progress the finalisation of the proposed new road names for the two sections of Margaret Street, Merrylands, located south of the M4 Motorway, to Bolger Close and Donaldson Close. The remaining section north of the M4 Motorway would continue to be named Margaret Street.

 

Recommendation

That Council proceed with the finalisation of the proposed road names of Bolger Close and Donaldson Close in Merrylands with the NSW Geographical Names Board.

 

Report

Following an issue where a resident had a delayed arrival of an emergency service vehicle due to the current configuration of Margaret Street, Merrylands, Council resolved the following on 4 March 2020:

“1. Endorse the proposed road names of Bolger Close and Donaldson Close for public exhibition; and

2.Proceed with finalisation of these proposed road names with the NSW Geographical Names Board (GNB), following exhibition, subject to no objections being received. If objections are received, a further report will be provided to Council.”

The new road names, as outlined in Figure 1, were publicly exhibited in accordance with the NSW Address Policy and User Manual. Council received one submission (Attachment 1) objecting to the road naming proposal, outlining the following key factors:

·    The landowner has required the attendance of emergency services and other services on many occasions, without any issue. There has never been any difficulty in identifying or locating the property in the 20 years that the landowner has resided at the property.

·    The landowner suffers from severe mental health issues and various other health conditions. The current address is recorded with every doctor, medical treatment provider and all service providers that they utilise, as well as other services the landowner’s family utilise.

·    The landowner has been residing at the property for over 20 years and there are innumerable places that have the current address listed. Even if the landowner was able to recollect every record that required changing, it would take a tremendous effort and place a significant strain on the landowner and the landowners mental health to notify and update each record.

Figure 1: Margaret Street Road Naming Proposal

Following review and consideration of the submission, it is recommended that Council proceed with the road naming proposal of Bolger Close and Donaldson Close, and progress the finalisation process with the Geographical Names Board. This will ensure that residents are not exposed to any unnecessary risks relating to the delayed arrival of emergency service vehicles. Council officers are available to assist affected residents with transition arrangements for the new road names at the appropriate time.

Should Council choose not to support the recommended road naming proposal, the following alternate options are available for consideration:

·    Proceed with the finalisation of the road naming proposal for Bolger Close only, and continue with the road name of Margaret Street for the remaining section south of the M4 Motorway.

·    Not proceed with the road naming proposal, and continue with the road name of Margaret Street for the two sections located south of the M4 Motorway.

Community Engagement

The proposed names were formally exhibited from Monday 13 July 2020 to Friday 31 July 2020. Council notified, in writing, the two properties affected by the change to the road name. A submission, objecting to the renaming of Margaret Street, was received from one of the affected landowners, as outlined in the report.

The Geographical Names Board undertook consultation with the prescribed authorities. No comments were received from the prescribed authorities.

Policy Implications

Policy implications for Council are outlined in the main body of this report.

Risk Implications

There are no risk implications for Council associated with this report.

Financial Implications

There are no financial implications for Council associated with this report.

CONCLUSION

Following Council’s previous resolutions on the naming of Margaret Street, Merrylands, it is recommended that Council proceed with the finalisation of the proposed new road names for the two sections of Margaret Street, Merrylands, located south of the M4 Motorway, to Bolger Close and Donaldson Close. This will ensure that residents are not exposed to any unnecessary risks relating to the delayed arrival of emergency service vehicles.

 

Attachments

1.     Summary of submission   

 


DOCUMENTS
ASSOCIATED WITH
REPORT C09/20-556

Attachment 1

Summary of submission


Council Meeting

 16 September 2020

PDF Creator


Council Meeting

 16 September 2020

 

 

Item No: C09/20-557

Council Submission on Planning Proposal for 1 Crescent Street, Holroyd

Responsible Division:                  Environment & Planning

Officer:                                      Director Environment & Planning

File Number:                              PP2020/0006

Community Strategic Plan Goal:  A great place to live  

 

 

Summary

This report provides an update on the planning proposal for a mixed use development at 1 Crescent Street, Holroyd (former Caterpillar site).  This proposal was initially considered by the former Holroyd Council, but is now under the planning authority of the Sydney Central City Planning Panel.

The Panel has issued a Gateway Determination on the proposal. Following the completion of conditions related to the Gateway Determination, the planning proposal was placed on public exhibition from 3 August 2020 to 30 August 2020. Council was granted an extension by the Panel until 30 September 2020 to provide a submission.

A draft submission has been prepared by Council officers on the planning proposal. Council has identified a number of concerns, including lack of alignment with strategic plans, and site specific concerns regarding the location, scale and impact of the proposal.

It is recommended that Council provides a submission on the planning proposal for 1 Crescent Street, Holroyd.  It is also recommended that Council delegate authority to the General Manager to liaise with the proponent and government agencies on the next stages for the planning proposal, to ensure that the community’s interests are represented as best as possible prior to further decisions by the NSW Government.

 

Recommendation

 

That Council:

1.  Endorse the draft submission to the Sydney Central City Regional Panel on the planning proposal for 1 Crescent Street, Holroyd, as provided in Attachment 1.

2.  Delegate authority to the General Manager to finalise the draft submission, including any minor typographical or editorial changes.

3.  Delegate authority to the General Manager to liaise with the proponent and government agencies on the next stages for the planning proposal, to ensure that the community’s interests are represented as best as possible prior to further decisions on the proposal by the NSW Government.

 

Report

Background

The planning proposal for a mixed use development at 1 Crescent Street, Holroyd (former Caterpillar site) was initially considered by the former Holroyd Council, but is now under the planning authority of the Sydney Central City Planning Panel.

The Panel has issued a Gateway Determination on the proposal. Following the completion of conditions related to the Gateway Determination, the planning proposal was placed on public exhibition from 3 August 2020 to 30 August 2020. Council was granted an extension by the Panel until 30 September 2020 to provide a submission.

Table 1 provides a chronology of events in regards to the planning proposal at 1 Crescent Street, Holroyd.  Information on the planning proposal is provided through the link http://www.leptracking.planning.nsw.gov.au/proposaldetails.php?rid=6785.

 

Date

Milestone

13 November 2014

Pre-lodgement meeting

9 February 2015

Councillor briefing by proponent

17 June 2015

Planning Proposal Request lodged

10 November 2015

Councillor briefing by officers

16 February 2016

Planning Proposal refused at Ordinary Council meeting

22 March 2016

Modified Planning Proposal submitted to Council

16 June 2016

Council notified of rezoning review for the Planning Proposal

15 June 2017

Meeting on rezoning review of planning proposal held by Sydney West Central Planning Panel

8 November 2017

Sydney West Central Planning Panel appointed as relevant planning authority

17 July 2019

Gateway Determination released by Sydney Central City Planning Panel

31 October 2019

Proponent requested amendment of Gateway Determination conditions

16-17 March 2020

Sydney Central City Planning Panel meeting to discuss amendments to Gateway Determination conditions. Briefing of Panel by Mayor and Director Environment and Planning on the planning proposal. Advice provided by Panel on planning proposal

7 July 2020

Department Planning, Industry and Environment issued an alteration to the Gateway Determination

3-30 August 2020

Public exhibition of the planning proposal

Table 1: Chronology of planning proposal for 1 Crescent Street, Holroyd

 

Transport for NSW (TfNSW) has also been liaising with Council officers regarding plans for the upgrade of the Woodville Road / Parramatta Road / M4 Motorway intersection, which is in close proximity to the site of the planning proposal. During this liaison, Council officers were surprised that the TfNSW staff appeared to have little knowledge of the proposal at 1 Crescent Street. At the time of the report, it is unclear that there is a consistent understanding of the proposal across the transport agency and clarity on the implications of the planning proposal for the proposed upgrade. Council officers will continue to liaise with TfNSW to confirm that the implications of the planning proposal are being considered for the upgrade works.

Key Issues Raised in the Submission

Council’s submission reaffirms its position that the proposal should not proceed as it lacks both strategic and site specific merit. A draft submission has been prepared by Council officers, as provided in Attachment 1, and covers the following issues:

Lack of Strategic Alignment

The proposal is not aligned with relevant strategic plans for the area.  This includes:

·    Parramatta Road Corridor Urban Transformation Strategy, which identifies the existing planning controls as the desired land use outcome for the site.  This Strategy was endorsed by the NSW Government

·    Cumberland 2030: Our Local Strategic Planning Statement, which does not identify the proposal as part of strategic planning for the area.  This Statement was endorsed by Council and received a letter of support from the Greater Sydney Commission

Adverse Traffic Impacts in the Merrylands Area

Council officers have reviewed existing traffic analysis for the proposal, and also commissioned a technical review through an independent consultant (Attachment 2). Significantly, while the majority of residential traffic from the proposal is forecast to travel west towards Merrylands, the traffic reports prepared as part of the planning proposal have not considered the impacts in the Merrylands area nor the future development permitted through current planning controls in the town centre.

In response to this, a traffic analysis and modelling exercise was undertaken by the independent consultant to understand these impacts of the development in greater detail.  The modelling covered both intersections already modelled as part of the planning proposal, and intersections which were not assessed as part of the planning proposal, and are graphically shown in Figure 1.

Figure 1: Intersections assessed for the traffic modelling exercise

Four scenarios were modelled as part of the traffic analysis.  These scenarios are:

1.  Base year (2019)

2.  Future year (2030) with background traffic growth only

3.  Future year (2030) with background traffic growth and 1 Crescent Street development traffic

4.  Future year (2030) with background traffic growth, 1 Crescent Street development traffic and mitigation measures

The results of the modelling indicate that the Pitt Street /Neil Street intersection at Merrylands will suffer the greatest impact from traffic generated by the proposed development, as shown in Figure 2 and 3 below.

Figure 2: Traffic modelling results, future year with background traffic growth only

Figure 3: Traffic modelling results, future year with background traffic growth and 1 Crescent Street development traffic

The analysis also identifies the need for traffic mitigation works to address the impacts of the planning proposal in the Merrylands area, including improvements to the Pitt Street / Neil Street intersection and the potential for a Merrylands traffic bypass scheme.

Poor Public Transport and Active Transport Access

The location of the proposed development is isolated from all modes of public transport. Access to the nearest bus and train networks are considered beyond industry standards (maximum walking distance of 400m to a bus stop, and 800m to a train station).  The closet railway station (Harris Park) is 900m away, whilst the closet bus stop is 450m away (Woodville Road, 907 bus route).

Pedestrian priority and amenity is poor surrounding the development, most of the footpaths are narrow, are directly next to high volume traffic with no protection and lack pedestrian priority at crossings. Currently, there are no pedestrian crossings across Woodville Road near the site, a pedestrian bridge over Woodville Road was previously considered, this concept has not been supported by Transport for NSW. There is no evidence currently available that indicates the proponent is planning to address these issues.

Arrangements for Affordable Housing Provision

The proponent was unsuccessful in their request to amend Condition 1(C) of the Gateway Determination and are still required to deliver 7% affordable housing in perpetuity (the proponent sought to reduce the term to 12 years but this was not supported by the Regional Panel). As part of its consideration of the matter, the Regional Panel acknowledged Council’s position for a higher proportion of affordable housing in perpetuity, and that affordable housing outcomes have been achieved for planning proposals in the area. However, no changes were made to the condition.

It is noted that the proponent seeks to retain the affordable housing units in private ownership, to be managed by a registered housing provider. The proponent also seeks an offset against development contributions which is assessed at $3.115 million. Notwithstanding the work undertaken to date as part of the planning proposal, there continues to be an inconsistency of the proposed affordable housing offering when assessed against Council’s Interim Affordable Housing Policy.

Built Form and Design Considerations

It is noted that a requirement of the Gateway Determination (as amended) is that a site specific Development Control Plan must be finalised before any development application is determined over the site. Council has concerns regarding the overall built form proposed development that include the following key issues:

·    A number of buildings are proposed to have a street wall heights of eight storeys, which is considered excessive and should not exceed three storeys

·    Inconsistency with setbacks and building separation when assessed with current planning controls

·    Insufficient information on access for residents to the adjoining Holroyd Sportsground, with improve access over A’Becketts Creek required to between integrate the site

·    Interface with adjoining industrial development in the area

Proposed Requirements should the Proposal Proceed

While it is recommended by Council officers that the planning proposal should not proceed at this time, the final decision is with the Sydney Central City Planning Panel as the planning authority on the proposal. Should the NSW Government decide to proceed with the proposal, Council has identified a number of requirements to mitigate impacts and derive public benefit from the proposal.  These include:

·    Improvements to transport infrastructure completed prior to the first occupation certificate:

Completion of road upgrade to Woodville Road and Parramatta Road by the NSW and Commonwealth Governments

Completion of road upgrades at Crescent Street as proposed by the developer

Completion of road upgrades in the Merrylands area by the developer to mitigate impacts identified by Council

Direct and safe active transport access to Parramatta and Granville, including linkages across Woodville Road and Parramatta Road

Shuttle bus by the developer to link the site with Merrylands and Parramatta

·    Commitment to an improved affordable housing provision, with clarity on the role of Council and mechanisms to achieve better alignment with Council’s policy.

·    Open space to be provided as outlined by the developer, integrated with the sportsground and to meet Council’s requirements.

·    Council to endorse the Development Control Plan prior to the lodgement of the first development application for the site.

Next Steps

It is recommended that the draft submission prepared on the planning proposal be endorsed by Council.  Subject to endorsement, Council officers will finalise the submission and provide this to the Sydney Central City Planning Panel.

As the final decision for the planning proposal rests with the NSW Government, it is important that Council continues to be engaged on the matter. To this end, it is also recommended that Council delegate authority to the General Manager to liaise with the proponent and government agencies on the next stages for the planning proposal.  This is to ensure that the community’s interests are represented as best as possible prior to further decisions by the NSW Government.

If Council chooses not to be involved in further liaison with the proponent and government agencies on the next stages for the planning proposal, there is a high risk that local implications and infrastructure requirements are not fully considered as part of the proposal.  Any adverse impacts would need to be dealt with by Council at a future stage once development proceeds at this location, with a financial and resource impact on Council that is not captured through satisfactory arrangements identified for the proposal.

Community Engagement

Public exhibition on the planning proposal was undertaken by the NSW Government from 3 August 2020 to 30 August 2020.  In addition, Council is undertaking a community survey on the proposal, with the results of the survey to be included with Council’s submission on the planning proposal.

Policy Implications

Policy implications for Council are outlined in the main body of the report.

Risk Implications

While Council has concerns on the location, scale and impact of the planning proposal, a decision for Council to not be involved on the next stages of the planning proposal could lead to a development proceeding that does not fully consider local implications and infrastructure requirements.  The involvement of Council officers in progressing relevant details with the proponent and government agencies will mitigate this impact.

Financial Implications

Should Council choose to be involved in discussions on satisfactory arrangements on the proposal, a Voluntary Planning Agreement will be prepared to capture the public benefit offer associated with the planning proposal.

CONCLUSION

This report provides an update on the planning proposal for a mixed use development at 1 Crescent Street, Holroyd (former Caterpillar site).  A draft submission has been prepared by Council officers on the planning proposal outlining a number of concerns. It is recommended that Council provides a submission on the planning proposal.  It is also recommended that Council delegate authority to the General Manager to liaise with the proponent and government agencies on the next stages for the planning proposal, to ensure that the community’s interests are represented as best as possible prior to further decisions by the NSW Government.

 

Attachments

1.     Draft Submission 1 Crescent Street Holroyd Planning Proposal  

2.     Traffic and Transport Technical Review for 1 Crescent St, Holroyd Planning Proposal (confidential)   

 


DOCUMENTS
ASSOCIATED WITH
REPORT C09/20-557

Attachment 1

Draft Submission 1 Crescent Street Holroyd Planning Proposal


Council Meeting

 16 September 2020

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Council Meeting

 16 September 2020

 

 

Item No: C09/20-558

Response to Notice of Motion - Food Delivery Services in the Cumberland LGA

Responsible Division:                  Works & Infrastructure

Officer:                                      Director Works & Infrastructure

File Number:                              FD-SERV

Community Strategic Plan Goal:  A safe accessible community  

 

 

Summary

 

This report provides a response to Notice of Motion (Min. 650) - Food Delivery Services, raised at Council Meeting of 1 April 2020.

 

 

Recommendation

That Council:

1.  Place the Draft Food Delivery Service Policy on public exhibition for a period of 28 days.

2.  Be provided with a further report detailing the outcome of the public consultation period.

 

Report

 

Council at its meeting of 1 April 2020, considered a Notice of Motion relating to the issues associated with food delivery services utilising bicycles on footpath areas and sought the development of a draft policy. In considering this item, Council resolved the following (Item C04/20-410, Min 650):

 

“That Council:

 

1.  Write to the various food delivery services such as however not limited to Uber Eats, Menulog, Deliveroo, DoorDash etc. that utilise a bicycle or motorbike vehicle explaining the rules regarding the use of footpaths and locations and manner in parking such vehicles;

 

2.  Also write to all the cafes/restaurants/food outlets in our LGA providing these rules and request their assistance with these delivery services so that we can keep pedestrians and shoppers safe as they walk along the footpaths;

 

3.  Develop a draft policy to be provide for council endorsement regarding this type of food delivery service; and

 

4.  Write to the Minister of Transport in relation to this matter.”

 

 

 

In response to this Notice of Motion, Council has written to food delivery service providers (including Uber Eats, Menulog, Deliveroo and DoorDash) outlining the provisions of the Road Rules Regulation 2014  as they relate to the use of bicycles on public land. Council has also written to the retail food premises throughout the Local Government Area (LGA) seeking their support in reminding riders to comply with their obligations under the Road Rules Regulation 2014.

 

Furthermore, Council sent correspondence to the Hon Andrew Constance MP, Minister for Transport and Roads raising Council’s concerns as a result of increased complaints from the community in relation to food delivery riders on footpaths, as well as the posed risk to pedestrian safety. Feedback was also requested from the Minister in relation to content which could be included in a draft policy. No response has been received to date.

 

The NSW Police has the jurisdiction to enforce the provisions of the Road Rules Regulation 2014 by way of issuing penalty notices to cyclists, there is also an opportunity for Council to continue to educate businesses and food delivery services. This can be done through the installation of Section 632 notices in accordance with the Local Government Act 1993, to prohibit a specific activity on public land (footpath area) such as the use of a bicycle by food delivery services. Council’s regulatory staff can then apply appropriate discretion to those observed to be contravening a Section 632 Notice, balancing their role of providing education yet also having the ability to issue a Penalty Notice for repeat offenders in accordance with the escalated regulatory framework of Council’s Compliance and Enforcement Policy.

 

Council has the capacity to install approximately 150 Section 632 Notices utilising existing poles throughout the Cumberland LGA, to educate members of the community regarding the use of bicycles on public land. The manufacture and installation of the signs has been quoted at approximately $100 per sign, resulting in a total cost of $15,000 should Council wish to pursue this initiative. Such a project is currently unfunded and would need to be sourced from the Works & Infrastructure operational budget.

 

The Draft Food Delivery Service Policy (Attachment 4) has been prepared to clarify the regulatory action available for breaches of the various legislation, whilst also maintaining a balanced approach in the handling of food delivery service riders (cyclists) to ensure that pedestrian safety on Council’s footpath areas remain paramount.

Community Engagement

 

Council has written to the prominent food delivery service providers, in addition to all the retail food premises across the Cumberland LGA, highlighting the legislation and subsequent rules that relate to the use of a footpath area by bicycle riders. A letter was also sent to the Hon Andrew Constance MP, Minister for Transport and Roads seeking feedback on Council’s concerns and providing an opportunity to include comments in the proposed draft policy.

The Draft Cumberland City Council Food Delivery Service Policy will be placed on public exhibition for a period of 28 days, inviting submissions through advertisement in local newspapers and on Council’s ‘Have Your Say’ community engagement website.

Policy Implications

This report proposes consideration of a draft policy in relation to food delivery service bicycle riders.

Risk Implications

Actions taken in response to the Notice of Motion (as outlined within this report) have the intent of reducing any potential risk implications for Council associated with food delivery service bicycle riders illegally utilising public footpath areas.

Financial Implications

Should Council wish to proceed with the initiative of installing Section 632 notices throughout town centres under the Local Government Act 1993, the estimated cost is $15,000. This project is currently unfunded and would therefore need to be considered in line with other commitments undertaken by the Works & Infrastructure Directorate.

CONCLUSION

This report outlines the staff actions undertaken in response to the Notice of Motion raised at Council Meeting of 1 April 2020 and recommends that the Draft Food Delivery Service Policy be placed on Public Exhibition for a period of 28 days.

 

Attachments

1.     Letter to Food Delivery Service providers  

2.     Letter to local retail food businesses  

3.     Letter to the Hon Andrew Constance MP, Minister for Transport and Roads  

4.     Draft Food Delivery Service Policy   

 


DOCUMENTS
ASSOCIATED WITH
REPORT C09/20-558

Attachment 1

Letter to Food Delivery Service providers


Council Meeting

 16 September 2020

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DOCUMENTS
ASSOCIATED WITH
REPORT C09/20-558

Attachment 2

Letter to local retail food businesses


Council Meeting

 16 September 2020

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DOCUMENTS
ASSOCIATED WITH
REPORT C09/20-558

Attachment 3

Letter to the Hon Andrew Constance MP, Minister for Transport and Roads


Council Meeting

 16 September 2020

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DOCUMENTS
ASSOCIATED WITH
REPORT C09/20-558

Attachment 4

Draft Food Delivery Service Policy


Council Meeting

 16 September 2020

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Council Meeting

 16 September 2020

 

 

Item No: C09/20-559

Cumberland Traffic Committee - Minutes of the Electronic Meeting held on 5 August 2020

Responsible Division:                  Works & Infrastructure

Officer:                                      Director Works & Infrastructure

File Number:                              T-28-02/08

Community Strategic Plan Goal:  A safe accessible community  

 

 

Summary

 

This report presents the minutes of the Cumberland Traffic Committee Electronic Meeting of 5 August 2020.

 

 

Recommendation

That:

1.     The minutes of Part 1 Items of the Cumberland Traffic Committee electronic meeting of 5 August 2020, be received and noted; and

2.     The minutes of Part 2 Items of the Cumberland Traffic Committee electronic meeting of 5 August 2020, be received and recommendations contained therein be approved.

 

Report

Due to COVID-19 restrictions, the Cumberland Traffic Committee meeting scheduled for 5 August 2020 was conducted electronically. The agenda for the electronic meeting was sent to all members, requesting feedback and concurrences to be returned to Council.

In accordance with the Cumberland Local Traffic Committee Terms of Reference, approved by Council on 20 May 2020 (Min. 694 - C05/20-443), the following Part 1 items have been approved under delegated authority, Item CTC-20-103 to 124 and CTC-20-150 to 157.

The Part 2 items are presented for Council’s approval. These are Item CTC-20-102 and Items CTC-20-125 to 149.

Community Engagement

Community consultation will occur in accordance with the recommendations of each report.

Policy Implications

There are no policy implications for Council associated with this report.

Risk Implications

There are no risk implications for Council associated with this report.

Financial Implications

The expenditure of funds associated with implementing the recommendations not approved under delegated authority will be included in the Council’s Traffic facility construction program.

 

Attachments

1.     Agenda of the Cumberland Traffic Committee meeting of 5 August 2020  

2.     Late Agenda of the Cumberland Traffic Committee meeting of 5 August 2020  

3.     Minutes of the Cumberland Traffic Committee meeting of 5 August 2020   

 


DOCUMENTS
ASSOCIATED WITH
REPORT C09/20-559

Attachment 1

Agenda of the Cumberland Traffic Committee meeting of 5 August 2020


Council Meeting

 16 September 2020

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DOCUMENTS
ASSOCIATED WITH
REPORT C09/20-559

Attachment 2

Late Agenda of the Cumberland Traffic Committee meeting of 5 August 2020


Council Meeting

 16 September 2020

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DOCUMENTS
ASSOCIATED WITH
REPORT C09/20-559

Attachment 3

Minutes of the Cumberland Traffic Committee meeting of 5 August 2020


Council Meeting

 16 September 2020

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Council Meeting

 16 September 2020

 

Item No: C09/20-560

Notice of Motion - Cumberland Local Environmental Plan

Councillor:                                  Ned Attie

File Number:                              SC483  

 

 

Summary

Pursuant to Notice, Councillor Attie submitted the following Motion.

 

Notice of Motion

That Council:

1.     Note the additional submissions received from various local stakeholders for the new Cumberland Local Environmental Plan. 

 

2.     Endorse the following additional site specific planning controls to be included in the new Cumberland Local Environmental Plan;  

  

a)  2 Ruth Street and 6 Burnett Street Merrylands – Increase Height to 21m and FSR to 2:1 in line with the adjacent B1 Zoning Controls as adopted at the ordinary meeting of council 15 July 2020.   

b)  68 McArthur Street Guildford to be zoned R4 with FSR of 1.5:1 and HOB of 21m.

c)  32-34 Marian Street and 2A Bury Road Guildford to be zoned R4 with FSR of 1.7:1 and HOB of 21m.

d)  27-29 Gelibolu Parade Auburn to be zoned B4 with FSR of 5:1 and HOB of 45m.

e)  7-10 Wayman Place Merrylands to have FSR of 3.5:1 and HOB of 38m.

f)   90A-100 Auburn Road Auburn to be zoned B4 with FSR of 3:1 and HOB of 32m.

  

3.     Amend Clause 6.12 of the new Cumberland Local Environmental Plan as adopted at the ordinary meeting of council 15 July 2020 to be as follows;  

6.12 Ground floor development in Zones B2 and B4;

 

1. The objective of this clause is to ensure that active uses are provided at the street level in certain business zones to encourage the presence and movement of people.  

2. This clause applies to land in the following zones:  

 (a) Zone B2 Local Centre,  

 (b) Zone B4 Mixed Use.  

3. Despite any other provision of this Plan, development consent must not be granted to development for the purposes of commercial premises or to a mixed use development with a commercial premises component, or a change of use of a building to commercial premises, on land to which this clause applies unless the consent authority is satisfied that the ground floor of a building:  

 

a)  Will not be used for the purposes of residential accommodation;

b)  Will not be used for a car park or to provide ancillary car parking spaces; and

c)  Will provide for uses and building design elements that encourage interaction between the inside of the building and the external public areas adjoining the building.  

 

4. Subclause (3) (a) does not apply to buildings on a site that:  

 

a)  are not immediately adjacent to the active street frontage, or  

b)  have no active street frontage as they are situated to the rear of or adjacent to buildings with active street frontages  

 

5. Subclause (3) (b) does not apply to a site that:  

 

a)  is greater than 60 metres in depth from all street frontages, or  

b)  has a gradient steeper than 15%, measured from boundary to boundary, or  

c)  is owned by a public authority and is to be used as a public or commuter car park.  

 

6. Subclause (3) (c) does not apply to any part of a building that:  

 

a)  faces a service lane that does not require active street frontages, or  

b)  is used for one or more of the following purposes:  

i.   a lobby for a commercial, residential, serviced apartment or hotel component of the building,  

ii.  access for fire services,  

iii. vehicular access.  

 

Resourcing Implications

The motion can be implemented using existing resources.

General Manager Advice

At the Council meeting of 15 July 2020, Council resolved to forward the planning proposal on the new Cumberland Local Environmental Plan to the Department of Planning, Industry and Environment for finalisation and gazettal.  The planning proposal has been submitted to the Department and finalisation work is underway.

 

Site Specific Proposals

Following this resolution, Council has received submissions on a number of site specific proposals for inclusion in the new Cumberland Local Environmental Plan.  A Councillor briefing was held on 12 August 2020 to provide information on these proposals, with this information provided in Attachment 1.

The status of the site specific proposals identified in the Notice of Motion is outlined in Table 1.

 

Site address

Proposal

Council officer recommendation (15 July 2020 report)

2 Ruth Street and 6 Burnett Street, Merrylands

Proposed changes to height and FSR

Recommended for inclusion in Cumberland LEP (Stream 1).  Resolution of Council amended Council officer recommendation

348-350 Merrylands Road, Merrylands

Proposed rezoning – R2 to B4

Stream 2: consider as part of Council’s strategic planning work program

68 McArthur Street, Guildford

Proposed rezoning – IN1 to R4

Stream 2: consider as part of Council’s strategic planning work program

32-34 Marian Street and 2A Bury Road, Guildford

Proposed rezoning – R2 to R4

Stream 2: consider as part of Council’s strategic planning work program

27-29 Gelibolu Parade, Auburn

Proposed rezoning – R2 to B4

Stream 2: consider as part of Council’s strategic planning work program

7-10 Wayman Place, Merrylands

Proposed changes to height and FSR

No submission provided as part of public exhibition for Cumberland LEP

90A-100 Auburn Road, Auburn

Proposed rezoning – R3 to R4

Stream 3: consider if submitted as a future planning proposal

Table 1: Submissions on Site Specific Proposals following Council Resolution

Amendment to Clause 6.12

The proposed amendment to Clause 6.12 seeks to provide further clarity on this planning control. This will assist Council officers in the assessment of development applications where this planning control applies. 

Next Steps

Should Council resolve to support the Notice of Motion, the outcomes of the resolution will be forwarded to the Department of Planning, Industry and Environment for their consideration. The decision as to whether these are included in the new Cumberland Local Environmental Plan is with the NSW Government.

Should Council resolve not to support the Notice of Motion, Council officers will continue to investigate the site specific proposals as part of the strategic planning work program endorsed by Council at the meeting of 15 July 2020. The amendment to Clause 6.12 may also be considered as part of future amendments to the Cumberland Local Environmental Plan.

 

Attachments

1.     Cumberland LEP – Post Council Report Submissions on Site Specific Proposals   

 


DOCUMENTS
ASSOCIATED WITH
REPORT C09/20-560

Attachment 1

Cumberland LEP – Post Council Report Submissions on Site Specific Proposals


Council Meeting

 16 September 2020

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